Samsung Lions Park – Eats and Drinks

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Let’s take a closer look at the inner-workings of the Daegu Samsung Lions Park in addition to all of the good eats and drink available to visitors.


The 24,000 seat stadium replaced the 10,000-seat Daegu Citizen Baseball Stadium, which was the oldest in the country. Built in 1948 and renovated before the launch of the KBO League in 1981, the old stadium lacked many facilities now seen as essential for a professional baseball team such as clay and natural grass turf, trainer’s rooms, and an indoor practice facility.

While the players and coaches undoubtedly appreciate the improved conditions of the newer Samsung Lions Park, there are also a great many benefits to baseball fans, eaters, and drinkers. We spoke to the man in charge all things food, beverage, and operations, Kwong Yeon Lee, to get an idea of just how much the new park has to offer.

While the players and coaches undoubtedly appreciate the improved conditions of the newer Samsung Lions Park, there are also a great many benefits to baseball fans, eaters, and drinkers. We spoke to the man in charge all things food, beverage, and operations, Kwong Yeon Lee, to get an idea of just how much the new park has to offer.

Whereas the “concessions” of the old park were a bunch of little independent stands, booths, and coolers located outside of the park, the current stadium contains 49 concession booths within the stadium from 15 different vendors. And there’s a Burger King! On a game day, the ~150 employees serve up everything from hot dogs, pizza, and fried chicken to more traditional Korean offerings such as ddeokbokki and samgyeopsal. To give us an idea of the unique array of food available at the Samsung Lions Park, Mr. Lee took us on the three-stop “Lions Park Taste Stars” (#라팍맛스타 on instagram) food tour around the stadium.

 

If you only pick one of the three stops, I recommend going for number three.

Stop one is “Lions Park Samgyeopsal”, which I am told is the most popular menu item at the park, a generous helping of pork with sides of rice, kimchi, vegetables, and bean paste for ₩18,000. Stop two is “Lions Park Herb Boneless Chicken” which comes with a side of the best potato wedges I have ever had for another ₩18,000. Stop three was the “Grand Slam Set” which was a great mix of spicy ddeokbokki, a couple types of fried dumplings, jeon, and some deep-fried cheese rice-cake all for the price of only ₩12,000 won. If you only pick one of the three stops, I recommend going for number three.

 

Of course, no baseball stadium experience is complete without a little beer (for me, anyway). Prices at the old park were lower, but you had to exit the game and the park in order to buy drinks. At the new park, beer is conveniently located at the vast majority of the concession booths. Draft Hite can be purchased nearly everywhere, but there is craft beer available on the first and fourth floors and at D-First Sports Pub located on the ground-level of the stadium.

It’s a huge pub with a surprisingly authentic American sports bar feel.

D-First Sports Pub, while attached to the stadium, is open every day unlike the rest of the concessions. It’s a huge pub with a surprisingly authentic American sports bar feel.  The bar is surrounded by TVs which, on game day, were of course mainly tuned to the Lions/Giants game. Their food menu includes lots of appetizers like nachos, cheese fries, french fries, and buffalo wings.  They also have pan pizzas (all around ₩14,000), hotdogs, etc. In addition to their craft beer, they also have a wine menu. On game day, we tried the sampler (₩12,000) flight of craft Pilsner, Weisen, Dunkel, and IPA. They also offer a Strong Pilsner. All went down without a hitch.

It should be noted that the pub takes reservations and requests, from wedding receptions to the random 3am foreign sporting event. If you’re having a hard time finding a spot to watch your favorite game or match from home, consider giving them a try. They also have a VIP room on the fourth floor for a more baller experience.

Before settling into our seats for the game, we made one last stop at the Samsung Lions Gift Shop. According to Jong Su Kim, manager for the last two years, the gift shop sees over a thousand customers every game day. Jerseys are the most popular item, especially for player Lee Seung Yeop. Jerseys range in price, and a player’s name can be added for an extra ₩20,000. If jerseys aren’t your thing, there are tons of items available from ₩5,000 baseballs to the ₩259,000 luggage carrier that the players use while traveling.


To recap, the stadium and concessions are open about two hours before the start of a game on game days. The gift shop is regularly open from 10am to 8pm and closes at the end of the game on game days. D-First Sports Pub is open every day, normally from 11am to 11pm but is willing to make exceptions if you want to put a group together. As season-ticket holder and recent first-pitch-thrower and superfan John Behrend told us, it’s a great park, and it’s a great time whether you’re coming alone, with friends, or with the whole family.

Sponsored by Samsung Lions Park

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